Vote!

If you live in California Like I do, we have a tone of Ballot Measures in the next election, 17 to be exact. I personally like to follow the money, that will usually send you in the right direction. So here is my study sheet, hope you find it helpful.

California Ballot Cheat Sheet

Prop: 51 School Construction Bonds
Would authorize the state to issue $9 billion in bonds for building and fixing schools the state would not have the authority to sell new bonds.
What would Prop 51 do?
Proposition 51 would authorize the state to issue $9 billion in bonds for building and fixing schools.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means you’re in favor of the state issuing $9 billion in bonds for school repairs and construction.
A “no” vote means you do not want the state to issue the bonds.
Prop 51: Money
Top donors to Yes: Coalition for Adequate School Housing,
Building Industry Assn., Community College Facility Coalition
Top donors to No: None
Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 52: Hospital Fees for Medi-Cal
Imposes fees on hospitals indefinitely to fund Medi-Cal, and the funds could only be reallocated with voter approval the existing hospital fee for Medi-Cal would end Jan. 1, 2018 unless the legislature extends it.
What would Prop 52 do?
Right now the state legislature can re-allocate some of those hospital fees to the state’s general fund. Prop 52 would: Extend the hospital fee program indefinitely. It’s scheduled to end on Jan 1, 2018 unless the legislature extends it. Require that voters approve any re-allocation of hospital fees first. Right now this power resides with the state legislature. Require a 2/3’s vote of the legislature to make any other changes to the hospital fee program, including ending it.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means the hospital fee program becomes permanent, and the fees could only be reallocated if voters approve it first.
A “no” vote means the hospital fee program would end on Jan. 1, 2018 unless the legislature extends it, and the legislature alone can divert the funds.
Prop 52: Money
Top donors to Yes: Calif. Health Foundation, Dignity Health, Sutter Health
Top donors to No: SEIU – United Healthcare Workers West
Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 53: Revenue Bonds
Requires statewide voter approval for revenue bonds over $2 billion no change to current revenue bond system
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means you want revenue bonds of $2 billion or more to be subject to voter approval statewide.
A “no” vote means you want to keep things the way they are.
Prop 53: Money
Top donors to Yes: Stockton farmer Dean Cortopassi and his wife Joan Cortopassi
Top donors to No: Gov. Jerry Brown, California Democratic Party, California Construction Industry Labor Management Cooperation Trust
Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Committee
Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 54: Publishing Legislative Bills
Requires legislature to post bills on the internet 3 days before voting, and requires audio and video recorded.
What would Prop 54 do?
Prop 54 would make a change in the law making process in Sacramento. It would require that:
Every bill is published in print and posted online at least three days before the state Senate or Assembly votes on it.
Audio and video recordings be made of the legislature’s public proceedings and put online within 24 hours.
Individuals be allowed to record audio or video of any public legislative proceeding. (They could not record closed sessions.)
Recordings be archived and available for use for any legitimate purpose without charge.
The publishing provision would take effect January 2017. The audiovisual recording provision would take effect a year later, in January 2018.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means you want bills to be made public three days before they are voted on, and you want audiovisual recordings made of public sessions.
A “no” vote means you want no changes to the way things are now.
recordings to be posted online no change to current system
Prop 54: Money
Top donors to Yes: Charles Munger Jr.
Top donors to No: California Democratic Party
Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Committee
Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 55: Tax Extension for Education
Would extend personal income taxes on high-income households to fund education and healthcare the extra personal income tax would end Dec. 31, 2018.
A “yes” vote means the personal income tax continues until 2030. A “no” vote means the personal income tax will expire at the end of 2017. Top donors to Yes: Calif. Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems, Calif. Teachers Assn., Calif. State Council of Service Employees Top donors to No: California’s Future PAC, sponsored by the Kersten Institute for Governance & Public Policy Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Committee Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16
Prop 55: Money
Prop 55 would extend a personal income tax that currently exists on higher income households. Right now the tax is set to expire at the end of 2017. If Prop 55 passes it would continue until 2030.
The revenues from the tax would go to support K-12 education. A smaller amount would go to community colleges.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?

Prop 56: Cigarette Tax

Increases cigarette tax by $2 tax a pack and a similar increases on most other tobacco products and e-cigarettes no new taxes on tobacco products.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means: a $2 per pack increase in the cigarette tax and a similar increase on most other tobacco products and e-cigarettes
A “no” vote means no new taxes on cigarettes, tobacco products or e-cigarettes.
Prop: 56 Money
Major tobacco companies are spending heavily against Prop. 56, while health care organizations and labor unions are supporting the measure. Top donors to Yes: Calif. Assn. of Hospitals and Health Systems, Tom Steyer, Calif. State Council of Service Employees.
Top donors to No: Philip Morris, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, ITG Brands Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Committee Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 57: Criminal Sentencing

Certain non-violent offenders could get out on parole earlier, plus judges would decide if juveniles are tried as adults. parole criteria stay the same; minors can be tried as adults without a hearing in juvenile court.
Prop: 57 Money What would Prop 57 do? It would affect two areas of our sentencing laws – juveniles and adults.
Juveniles: Most of the time defendants under the age of 18 are tried as juveniles. But sometimes if the crime is serious enough, juveniles as young as 14 can be tried as adult and given an adult sentence. Serious crimes include murder, robbery or some sex offenses. Right now prosecuting attorneys make that decision. Prop 57 would change that. It would have judges make that decision after a hearing is held. If prop 57 passes fewer minors would be transferred to adult courts.
Adults: Prop 57 would offer prisoners convicted of non-violent crimes a better chance at early parole by giving them more credit for good behavior, completing rehab and classes. Prisoners would have to serve the time for their “primary offense” in order to be eligible for early release. An estimated 7000* inmates would be immediately eligible. Another 18,000 non-violent felons might be eligible for early parole under Prop 57.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” on 57 means certain non-violent offenders could get out on parole earlier, plus judges would decide if minors are tried as adults.
A “no” vote means things stay the way they are.
Prop: 57 Money
Top donors to Yes: Gov. Jerry Brown’s Ballot Measure Committee, Calif. Democratic Party, Netflix co-founder Reed Hastings
Top donors to No: Assn. of Deputy District Attorneys Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 58: English Proficiency

Would make it easier for public schools to decide how to teach students learning English in bilingual or English-immersion classes things stay as they are, requiring English-only programs for most English learners.
Prop 58 deals with how we teach English to non-English speaking students in our public schools. Most of the students affected by this are Spanish-speakers. There 1.4 million of them in California, so this would impact many children. Prop 58 would: Give schools districts more flexibility in how they teach English learners. It would make it easier for schools to offer both bilingual and English immersion classes. It would require schools to get input from parents and their communities about what languages they would like taught and what methods should be used. It would encourage school districts to provide classes in foreign languages to English speaking students, including “dual immersion” programs. That’s when classes are taught in two languages to students who want to learn both languages.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote would make it easier for public schools to offer language instruction in bilingual and English-immersion classes.
A “no” vote means things stay as they are, requiring English-immersion as the primary way to teach English learners.
Prop 58: Money
Top donors to Yes: Thomas Steyer, Calif. Teachers Assn., NextGen California
Top donors to No: None Source: California Secretary of State Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 59: Corporate Political Spending
Would ask California’s elected officials to use their authority to increase regulation of campaign spending and contributions (undo Citizens United) elected officials would not be asked to try to change campaign spending regulations.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means you want the state and federal lawmakers from California to use their authority to try to undo Citizens United.
A “no” vote means things stay as they are
Prop 59: Money
Top donors to Yes: NextGen Climate
Top donors to No: None Source: California Secretary of State Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 60: Adult Film Regulation
Make sure condoms are used, there would be no change to current adult film regulations.
What would Prop 60 do?
Prop 60 would require that producers of pornography make sure their actors wear condoms and to post the condom requirements. It would require the producers to get a health license from the state, and to pay for medical exams, vaccines and other health services for their performers. It requires adult film companies to keep all the performers’ health records private. It also requires that talent agents refer their clients to licensed adult film productions only. Performers could sue producers who don’t comply with the law. They could also sue investors or anyone who has a financial interest in the film. It would allow private citizens and whistle blowers to “pursue violators” when the State doesn’t. If passed the law would be enforced by Cal-Osha, the state agency that oversees worker health and workplace safety. Under certain circumstances California residents can also bring lawsuits against filmmakers.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means the state should regulate and license the porn industry and be sure condoms are used.
A no vote means there would be no change to current adult film regulations.
Prop: 60 Money
Top donors to Yes: AIDS Healthcare Foundation
Top donors to No: Wicked Pictures, John Stagliano and affiliated production companies Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 61: State Prescription Drug Prices
State agencies can’t pay more for any prescription drug than the lowest price paid by the U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs state agencies continue to negotiate drug prices on their own
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote would require the state to buy drugs at the same discounted prices as the Veterans Administration enjoys.
A “no” vote means things stay the same.
Prop: 61 Money Money for Prop. 61 comes almost entirely from the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, while pharmaceutical companies are spending heavily against the measure.
Top donors to Yes: AIDS Healthcare Foundation, Calif. Nurses Assn.
Top donors to No: Merck & Co., Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 62: Abolish Death Penalty

Repeals California’s death penalty and replaces it with life in prison without parole would keep the death penalty as part of California’s criminal sentencing laws**
What would Prop 62 do?
Prop 62 would repeal the death penalty in California. Convicts who are currently on death row would have their sentences changed to life in prison without parole. Inmates would have to work while in prison and a larger portion of their wages would go to victim restitution.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means you want to abolish California’s death penalty. Those already on death row would get life in prison without parole.
A “no” vote means you want to keep the death penalty as part of California’s criminal sentencing laws.
There’s another ballot measure, Prop 66, dealing with the death penalty on the ballot. How do these two props effect each other? If one proposition passes and the other fails, then obviously the winning proposition becomes law. If they both fail, things stay the way they are now. If they both pass, then the proposition that received the most votes becomes law. A “no” vote means things stay the same.
Prop: 62 Money
Top donors to Yes: Thomas Steyer, Stanford Professor Nicholas McKeown, Netflix founder Reed Hastings
Top donors to No: Calif. Correctional Peace Officers Assn., Peace Officers Research Assn., Calif. Assn. of Highway Patrolmen Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

PROP 63: Ammunition Sales & Background Checks
New restrictions for buying and selling ammunition including background checks no new firearm or ammunition requirements
What would Prop 63 do?
It would outlaw large-capacity magazines. Magazines are the devices that hold the bullets that feed into automatic weapons. A magazine typically holds 30 rounds (bullets). Prop 63 says you could neither buy them nor own them. It would require instant background checks and authorization for anyone who wants to buy ammunition in California – any kind of ammunition, bullets or magazines. It would require most ammunition to be sold by licensed gun stores and reported to the Department of Justice. It would require gun stores to report lost or stolen guns or ammo to law enforcement. A person who has been convicted of stealing a gun would not be allowed to possess a gun.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means you’re in favor of tougher ammo laws and background checks.
A “no” vote means you’re against them. But remember, since much of Prop 63 is already the law, whether it passes or fails won’t make a huge difference.
Prop: 63 Money
Top donors to Yes: Calif. Democratic Party, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sean Parker
Top donors to No: National Rifle Assn., California Rifle & Pistol Assn. Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 64: Legalize Marijuana
Adults could legally grow, possess and use marijuana only medical marijuana would be legal.
What would Prop 64 do?
Prop 64 would legalize marijuana and hemp in California. Pot is already legal for medical use. This would go further and legalize it for recreational use. Adults 21 or older could have up to an ounce of pot and grow up to six plants. You could not consume marijuana in public or drive high. You could not give any to minors. There would be a 15% sales tax imposed. Commercial growers would have to be licensed. They will be taxes at $9.75 per ounce of flowers and $2.75 per ounce of leaves. (Medical marijuana is excluded.) Packaging, labeling, advertising and marketing of cannabis would be regulated. But advertising to children is prohibited. To prevent corporations from getting a monopoly, big companies would have to wait five years to get a license. (Big tobacco has been considering getting into the pot business for years.) It would also allow certain people convicted of marijuana violations to be re-sentenced and/or get their records cleared. Pot shops could not be located within 600 feet of school or where children gather. Create environmental regulations for the efficient use of water and safe use of pesticides. Hemp could be grown as an agricultural product and academic research.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
A “YES” vote would make recreational marijuana legal for adults in California.
A “NO” vote would keep things the way they are now with only medical marijuana legal.
Prop: 64 Money
Top donors to Yes: Sean Parker, Fund for Policy Reform, New Approach PAC Top donors to No: Sam Action, Inc., Julie Schauer, CA Assn. of Highway Patrolmen Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 65: Original Sale of Reusable Bags
Would divert the money from the sale of reusable bags into a state environmental fund money from the sale of reusable bags could go to any purpose* What does Prop 65 say? Prop 65 deals with grocery bags. Yes, there are two propositions on this issue. (See Prop 67 for more info.) Prop 65 says when grocery stores sell carryout bags to customers the money would have to go to a state-run fund for the environment. The fund is called the Wildlife Conservation Board.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean?
This is one case where you should pay attention to who’s behind it. If you agree with the plastic bag companies vote “yes” for Prop 65. It would divert the money from the sale of carry out bags into a state environmental fund. If you agree with environmental groups vote “no” on Prop 65. It would allow grocery stores to keep the money from the sale of reusable bags.
Prop: 65 Money
Top donors to Yes: Hilex Poly Co., Formosa Plastics Corp., Superbag Corp. Top donors to No: None Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 66: Death Penalty Reform
Changes procedures for death penalty appeals to speed up the process no changes to current law**
What would Prop 66 do? Prop 66 would speed up the legal process in several ways:
It would limit the number of petitions a convicted inmate could file.
It would increase the number of attorneys who handle death penalty cases by requiring attorneys who handle non-capital appeals to accept death penalty appeals.
Each murderer given the death penalty would be assigned an attorney right away, rather than waiting five or more years.
The trial courts who know death penalty law the best will deal with the first appeals.
The appeals would have to be reviewed faster and all reviews completed within five years.It would require death row inmates to work and pay restitution to victims.
What does a “yes” or “no” vote mean? What does a “yes” vote on Prop 66 mean?
A “yes” vote means you want to keep the death penalty but you want the proposed reforms to speed up the process.
A “no” vote means you don’t want the proposed changes to become law.
There’s another ballot measure, Prop 62, that wants to end the death penalty. How do these two props interact? Prop 62 – Death Penalty Repeal If one proposition passes and the other fails, then obviously the winning proposition becomes law. And if they both fail, things stay the same. But if they both pass, then the proposition that received the most votes becomes law. *Contributions supporting Prop. 62 are also used to oppose Prop. 66. Contributions opposing Prop. 62 are also used to support Prop. 66.
Prop 66 Money
Top donors to Yes: Calif. Correctional Peace Officers Assn., Peace Officers Research Assn., Calif. Assn. of Highway Patrolmen
Top donors to No: Thomas Steyer, Stanford Professor Nicholas McKeown, Netflix founder Reed Hastings Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16

Prop 67: Ban Plastic Bags
A state-wide ban on plastic bags would take effect, stores would keep the money from selling reusable bags grocery stores would continue to provide free plastic bags unless local laws prohibit it*
Prop 67 prohibits only single-use plastic bags and allows people to get their groceries in a paper, recyclable or compostable bag if they pay a 10-cent fee.
What does a “yes” vote mean?
A “yes” vote means a state-wide ban on plastic bags will take effect. What does a “no vote mean? A “no” vote means grocery stores can continue to provide free plastic bags unless local law
What about all the cities that have already passed their own bag ban?
About 120 cities or counties have already banned plastic bags. Among them are Los Angeles, Glendale, Long Beach, Pasadena, Santa Barbara, Santa Monica, San Francisco and San Diego.
Prop: 67 Money
Top donors to Yes: Calif. Grocers Assn., major Democratic donor Tom Steyer, funder of environmental groups Anne Earhart
Top donors to No: Hilex Poly Co., Formosa Plastics Corp., Superbag Corp.
Source: California Secretary of State, Fair Political Practices Commission Last updated by CALmatters 10/23/16
If a city or county has already passed a ban on plastic bags, that law will stay in place and will not be affected by Prop 67.
If and when a statewide ban goes into effect, any ordinance passed by a city or county after that would be superseded by the state law.

Notes

* If both plastic bag measures (Props 65 and 67) pass, the one with the most votes becomes law
**If both death penalty measures (Props 62 and 66) pass, the one with the most votes becomes law

Opposite Racism?

Opposite racism is a term used to spell it out serves of discrimination and prejudice perpetrated by racial minorities or historically oppressed cultural groupings against individuals owned by the racial bulk or historically prominent ethnic groups.

Quite simply, it is slow discrimination predicated on racial criteria.

The consumption of the word is questionable.

Some have accused affirmative action to be an instance of officially sanctioned opposite racism, talking about it as “preferential treatment, discriminating and only customers of under-represented groupings, which were treated unjustly before, against innocent people”.

On the far side of the political variety, some groups worried about cultural justice and the passions of cultural minorities have eliminated so far as denying its living altogether

Nuclear War in 2017?

A nuclear holocaust or nuclear apocalypse is a theoretical scenario involving widespread destruction and radioactive fallout causing the collapse of civilization, through the use of nuclear weapons.

Under such a scenario, some of the Earth is made uninhabitable by nuclear warfare in future world wars.

Besides the obvious direct destruction of cities by nuclear blasts, the potential aftermath of a nuclear war could involve firestorms, a nuclear winter, widespread radiation sickness from fallout, and/or the temporary loss of much modern technology due to electromagnetic pulses.

Some scientists, such as Alan Robock, have speculated that a thermonuclear war could result in the end of modern civilization on Earth, in part due to a long-lasting nuclear winter.
In one model, temperatures following a full thermonuclear war fall for several years by 7 to 8 degrees Celsius on average.

The accuracy of such models are often the subject of partisan dispute.

Early Cold War-era studies suggested that billions of humans would nonetheless survive the immediate effects of nuclear blasts and radiation following a global thermonuclear war.
Some scholars argue that nuclear war could indirectly contribute to human extinction via secondary effects, including environmental consequences, societal breakdown, and economic collapse.

Additionally, it has been argued that even a relatively small-scale nuclear exchange between India and Pakistan involving 100 Hiroshima yield weapons, could cause a nuclear winter and kill more than a billion people.

Since 1947, the Doomsday Clock of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has visualized how close the world is to a nuclear war.

The threat of a nuclear holocaust plays an important role in the popular perception of nuclear weapons. It features in the security concept of mutually assured destruction (MAD) and is a common scenario in survival-ism.

Nuclear holocaust is a common feature in literature and film, especially in speculative genres such as science fiction, dystopian and post-apocalyptic fiction.
So, two questions:

What is Kim Jong-un trying to prove?

How long can you poke the bear?

Institutional Racism In America!

Institutional racism (also called institutionalized racism) is a kind of racism indicated in the practice of sociable and political establishments.

Institutional racism is also racism by individuals or casual social communities, governed by behavioral norms that support racist thinking and foment dynamic racism.

It really is shown in disparities regarding riches, income, legal justice, employment, real estate, health care, politics electric power and education, among other activities.

Whether implicitly or explicitly portrayed, institutional racism occurs whenever a certain group is targeted and discriminated against based mostly after contest. Institutional racism is mainly implicit, so that it is often undetected.

Institutional racism was discussed in 1967 by Kwame Ture (previously Stokely Carmichael) and Charles V. Hamilton in Black colored Electricity:

The Politics of Liberation, proclaiming that while specific racism is often identifiable due to its overt aspect, institutional racism is less perceptible due to its “less overt, a lot more subtle” aspect.

Institutional racism “originates in the procedure of proven and respected makes in the contemporary society, and therefore obtains far less general public condemnation than [specific racism].”

Each goes to give cases:
“When white terrorists bomb a dark church and wipe out five dark-colored children, that can be an act of specific racism, generally deplored by most sections of the modern culture.

But when for the reason that same city–Birmingham, Alabama–five hundred dark-colored babies die every year due to lack of vitality, food, shelter and medical facilities, and hundreds more are damaged and maimed literally, psychologically and intellectually because of conditions of poverty and discrimination in the dark-colored community, that is clearly a function of institutional racism.

Whenever a black family movements into a home in a white area and is also stoned, burnt or routed out, these are victims of any overt take action of specific racism which most people will condemn.

Nonetheless it is institutional racism that will keep dark-colored people locked in dilapidated slum tenements, at the mercy of the daily victim of exploitative slumlords, stores, loan sharks and discriminatory realtors.

The world either pretends it generally does not know of the second option situation, or is actually not capable of doing anything important about any of it.”

Institutional racism was described by Sir William Macpherson in the 1999 Lawrence record (UK) as:

“The collective inability of an company to offer an appropriate and professional service to people for their shade, culture, or cultural origin. It could be seen or diagnosed in processes, behaviour and behaviour which total discrimination through unwitting prejudice, ignorance, thoughtlessness and racist stereotyping which disadvantage minority cultural people.”